Category Archives: Reviews

Saturday Of Book Reviewing – Green’s Looking For Alaska

I imagine many have read this book before myself. Since it’s so well known, I rather think I’ll ‘review’ it by continuing a trend I started with BJ Novak’s novel: answering John Green’s discussion questions at the end! There are a few, so bear with me folks, along this journey of general thought over specific details.

Some Intentionally Vague and Broad Discussion Questions Continue reading Saturday Of Book Reviewing – Green’s Looking For Alaska

Saturday of Book Reviewing – Harris’ Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values

Disclaimer #1: This book was written by a gentleman who does not believe in God, nor in free will. His perspective is both enlightening and potentially damaging to those who wish to hold tight to an exclusively religious worldview. To be frank: straight up avoid this book if you think people can only live by a moral code given by a higher power; nothing he writes will make sense to you. Continue reading Saturday of Book Reviewing – Harris’ Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values

Saturday of Book Reviewing – Moore’s Lamb

See also: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ’s Childhood Pal
See also: Read awhile ago, reviewing now in honor of Jesus’ bday celebration last sunday! Hurray for Christmas.

From the first subtitle alone, I’m sure you can guess this novel will be stored under ‘irreverent comedy’. This guess is correct, but incomplete. Christopher Moore, our author du jour, is fairly well known for his absurdist fiction and Douglas Adamsesque style of writing. He likes recurring jokes, making even his villains fully sympathetic characters, and playing with history, so if you lose track of one liners, prefer your bad guys in black hats with swirly mustaches, and only enjoy historical fact: this is not the book for you. Continue reading Saturday of Book Reviewing – Moore’s Lamb

Saturday of Book Reviewing – Chamber’s The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet

Written far more recently than my usual science fiction fare, Becky Chamber’s first entry in this ongoing series, Wayfarers, is a delight and an abrupt departure from the hard sci-fi of the past. Continue reading Saturday of Book Reviewing – Chamber’s The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet

10 Thoughts from Star Wars: The Last Jedi

I thought about writing a full-fledged review of Star Wars: The Last Jedi after seeing it on Friday night, but I’ve had several days to mull it over and read some other articles about it.

Such as this one, explaining why, evidently, a lot of Star Wars fans hated the film: http://epicstream.com/features/Top-13-Reasons-Why-Some-Star-Wars-Fans-Hate-The-Last-Jedi

I think instead I’m just going to highlight what stuck out to me about the movie.

Sound good?

***Spoilers Abound***

Continue reading 10 Thoughts from Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Saturday Of Book Reviewing – BJ Novak’s One More Thing: Stories and Other Stories

Now, while this book was super entertaining, I don’t really have much to add to that. It was fun. Light. But it wasn’t really a piece that I would revisit; it didn’t offer any intense moral lessons or revealing new facts about life or the world or thought. I enjoyed it’s skewing of expectations and surprising inversions of old tales. However, this would be a very short review if that’s all I had to say. Continue reading Saturday Of Book Reviewing – BJ Novak’s One More Thing: Stories and Other Stories

A Hundred Thousand Souls: PVRIS’s Second Album Elevates their Sound

All We Know of Heaven, All We Need of Hell, PVRIS’s second album, is perhaps my favorite new album this year. While it feels less emo-core and more electronic than White Noise, PVRIS still delivers hard-hitting music with even more piercing lyrics. Continue reading A Hundred Thousand Souls: PVRIS’s Second Album Elevates their Sound

THE LONG PATROL Still Captures the Imagination

Sometimes a story just sticks with you. The words pass from the page through your eyes and are spun into vivid images in your mind. Occasionally, those images linger somewhere within you. Their presence may not always be obvious, but their echoes reverberate in quiet moments, reminders of those fleeting images. Continue reading THE LONG PATROL Still Captures the Imagination

Saturday of Book Reviewing – The Complete Maus

Recently, I read Art Spiegelman’s Pulitzer Prize winning graphic novel Maus. Written about his father, Vladek’s, experiences during the Holocaust. It’s been on my to read list for awhile and given the resurgence of f**king Nazis in America right now, this seemed a punctual read.

Continue reading Saturday of Book Reviewing – The Complete Maus