Category Archives: Reviews

Thoughts from the Game of Thrones Premier

If you can’t tell from the glut of content flooding every website, Game of Thrones is back. But I can’t just stay out of the fray during the biggest television series finale ever.

I have reactions too! For now, I’m just going to get my own notes on the season 8 premier on proverbial paper.

Beware… Here be spoilers!

Continue reading Thoughts from the Game of Thrones Premier

Review: “The Price of Inequality” is Heavy on Rhetoric, Light on Much Else

The Price of Inequality: How Today’s Divided Society Endangers Our Future by economist Joseph E. Stiglitz is in many ways a reaction to the Great Recession of 2008 and the US’s response to it.

I listened to this book on Audible, which likely impacts the way I feel about it. In short, I probably could have used the footnotes available in the print version. Continue reading Review: “The Price of Inequality” is Heavy on Rhetoric, Light on Much Else

With Tyranny on Hand: A Sound of Thunder’s Hope through Metal

While wandering around Baltimore Comic Con last fall, I happened upon a large vendor table playing metal music and loaded with vivd artwork.

There I met guitarist Josh Schwartz from A Sound of Thunder, a metal band based Northern Virginia who had just released an album and accompanying comic book.

Josh is a nice dude, they’re a local band, and they’re clearly into storytelling through their music. So of course I picked up the album. And it’s fantastic.

Continue reading With Tyranny on Hand: A Sound of Thunder’s Hope through Metal

What The Umbrella Academy Covers: Sci-Fi Mainstays and Comic Book Commons

Written by Gerard Way and illustrated by Gabriel Ba, The Umbrella Academy is another example of comic book turned TV show, following in the footsteps of similarly dark realism properties like the Marvel series quintet, DC’s Arrowverse, and Wynonna Earp. It’s an interesting road now oft traveled in the pursuit of more viewers; a path that borrows generously from other mediums as well as other generations.

This fanciful musing on what TUA weaves well into its own dynamic story is in no way a slight against it. I enjoyed the first season quite a lot and finished it fast. Tropes and throwbacks are categorized as such , and repeated like so, because, in a world full of individuals, occasionally strangely specific themes seem to grip our interest.

In this post, I wish to explore the familiar as an enticement to embrace the new. Continue reading What The Umbrella Academy Covers: Sci-Fi Mainstays and Comic Book Commons

Saturday of Book Reviewing: The Turn Of The Screw and The Aspern Papers

a turn of the screw – an action that makes a bad situation worse, especially one that forces someone to do something.
– so says the Cambridge Dictionary

Inspiring fright and night terrors amongst fellow horror classics like Dracula and Frankenstein with their respective monsters, The Turn of The Screw is a seminal work for ghost stories. BOO!

One that I had failed to read until now.

Henry James wrote this novella back in 1898, and to my mind, one of the reasons it has resonated with so many fans comes down to one factor: its flexibility of interpretation. Readers get to navigate this novel as they so choose, and at the end? Only the dead know what the reality may have been. May still be. Continue reading Saturday of Book Reviewing: The Turn Of The Screw and The Aspern Papers

Book Review: ‘The Hate U Give’ by Angie Thomas, Matters

I just finished listening to The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas on Audible, and I highly recommend it to anyone who cares about modern American society.

A ton of people have read it already, but this book provides a vital window into race relations and socioeconomic issues in the US — in how they impact one family. Continue reading Book Review: ‘The Hate U Give’ by Angie Thomas, Matters

Netflix’s ‘OUTLAW KING’ Falls Flat

While I was on paternity leave, I had a lot of time to binge-watch Netflix, so I was excited to get to some of the films that had been piling up in my list.

Outlaw King, Netflix’s historical fiction about Robert the Bruce’s rebellion against the English crown, was a natural pick for me.

  1. I like Chris Pine
  2. I love Scotland
  3. And I’m interested in Scottish history. I nearly wrote my very first history paper on William Wallace when I was 14, mainly because I had watched Braveheart a thousand times and read about some of the historical battles depicted there.

Unfortunately, while this movie did a lot of things well, it didn’t resonate with me the way I anticipated it would. Continue reading Netflix’s ‘OUTLAW KING’ Falls Flat

Netflix’s ‘BODYGUARD’ a Suspenseful, Fast-Paced Ride

I unwittingly finished watching season one of Bodyguard today. The Netflix show starring Game of Thrones’s Richard Madden ran for only six episodes, when I really thought it could have carried eight or ten.

But, ultimately, I enjoyed its forward-moving and suspenseful brevity. Continue reading Netflix’s ‘BODYGUARD’ a Suspenseful, Fast-Paced Ride

Book Review: Caught by MLS Weech

I picked up Caught directly from MLS Weech at his book launch in Glen Burnie, MD. I think that was back in early 2017, so I’m sorry to say it took me a while to get to this one.

So, yeah, in case it’s not clear enough, here’s my disclosure: Weech is a friend. He’s also an imaginative and vivid writer. Spoiler-free review follows. Continue reading Book Review: Caught by MLS Weech